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Dr. Kimlin Tam Ashing, PhD

Professor and Director of the Center of Community Alliance for Research and Education (CCARE), City of Hope

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An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure

01/07/2014 09:57pm | 8039 views
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Capacity Building in the Hispanic Community: A Mission to Improve Health and Lives

29/08/2013 07:17am | 9922 views

Capacity building refers to those activities that a non-profit engages in to achieve, improve upon and sustain its mission over time. These activities are usually focused on ways to engage and better address the needs of the community, as well as develop the infrastructure to support such activities and document the impact – which if successful means the ability to serve more and more members with greater benefit to the community.

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About the Author

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Dr. Kimlin Tam Ashing, PhD

Professor and Director of the Center of Community Alliance for Research and Education (CCARE), City of Hope

Dr. Kimlin Tam Ashing, Ph.D is professor and director of the Center of Community Alliance for Research and Education at City of Hope. She received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Colorado-Boulder. Previous to her appointment at City of Hope, she spent 12 years conducting research at the University of California-Los Angeles advancing theoretical and methodological approaches as behavioral scientist and psycho-oncologist. She is active in several cancer-related organizations and serves on the Executive Council of Los Angeles American Cancer Society and The Intercultural Council on Cancer. 

Dr. Ashing is the notable leader in examining cancer disparities, quality of life and survivorship, and has published over 25 articles and book chapters. Her work in this area is significant and innovative and guides much of the cross-cultural research. Currently, she is developing and implementing community participatory interventions to reduce the risk and burden of chronic illness, in particular cancer. Dr. Ashing examines relevant historical and cultural contexts as it relates to providing culturally competent health care.