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A Disproportionate Burden of Risk

For patients that carry the BRCA mutation, the chance of developing breast cancer ranges from 57% to 85% lifetime risk. Initial studies suggest a higher proportion of late stage breast cancer when there is less early detection and screening.

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Information That Can Bring Peace of Mind

Did you know your risk of inheriting the BRCA gene mutation if it runs in your family is only 50%? You have just as much chance of finding out that you don’t have it, which will spare you from the worry of not knowing and more frequent screenings.

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Performing Breast Self-Exams

Enhancing your breast self-exam skills and performing them regularly will increase your self-awareness and self-advocacy – and is particularly advantageous for young, high-risk Latinas who put this into practice from an early age.

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Early Detection and Screening Are Critical for Latinas

In one study, 25% of Latinas with a personal or family history of breast or ovarian cancer had the BRCA gene mutation – which brings significant increase in risk for these types of cancers.

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Your Heritage is Hereditary

Don’t be blindsided healthwise because of incomplete family cancer history reporting – often the case in immigrant populations separated from multi-generational and extended family, or influenced by cultural mores about sharing health issues.

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Participating Latinas Express a Dedication to Engagement

City of Hope’s bilingual / bicultural cancer risk counselors and clinicians bridge cultural barriers, speak the language, and work as a team to earn your trust as “significant other” caregivers.

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The Importance of Earning the Trust of Latino Patients

24/05/2014 08:27am | 7387 views

In this video,  Dr. Jeffery Weitzel, Chief of the Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics and Professor, Director, Cancer Screening and Prevention Program Network at City of Hope, discusses how physicians need to adapt their approach to Hispanic patients especially  with regards to genetic counseling. 

A world-renowned geneticist on cancer and Latinas, Dr. Weitzel shares his thoughts on how important the inclusion of family is when counseling a Hispanic patient. Physicians need to share with them how this will impact their families in order to earn their trust . In the end, he says, if you can win over the heart of a Latina she is more likley to be successful in her treatment and recovery.

 

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Overcoming Fear and Instilling Hope for Latinas with Breast Cancer

19/08/2014 09:06am | 6982 views

In this video,  Dr. Jeffery Weitzel, Chief of the Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics and Professor, Director, Cancer Screening and Prevention Program Network at City of Hope, discusses how to Latinas need to overcome their fear of breast cancer and instead focus on hope for treatment and recovery.

A world-renowned geneticist and researcher on cancer and Latinas, Dr. Weitzel works with many Latinas both in the U.S. and in Latin and South America to further understand how to treat and ultimately eradicate breast cancer in this population.

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The HHL Interview with Dr. Jeffrey Weitzel – Part 2: Culturally-Competent Connections and Interventions

21/03/2015 05:57pm | 6930 views

In part two of his interview with Glenn Llopis of Center for Hispanic Leadership, Dr. Jeffrey Weitzel reveals some of the work he and his team are doing to break down the previously-discussed barriers to preventative care in the Hispanic community – especially amongst Latinas who may have a genetic predisposition to breast cancer –and the many advances happening in the field of risk assessment and culturally-competent counseling and intervention.

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The HHL Interview with Dr. Jeffrey Weitzel – Part 1: Latinas, Breast Cancer Risk, and the Barriers to Prevention

10/02/2015 07:46am | 6581 views

HHL contributor Dr. Jeffrey Weitzel recently sat down with Glenn Llopis, founder and CEO of Center for Hispanic Leadership, to give us an update on his research with breast cancer in the Latina community.

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About the Author

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Dr. Jeffrey Weitzel

Chief of the Division of Clinical Cancer Genetics and Professor, Director, Cancer Screening & Prevention Program Network, City of Hope

Dr. Weitzel's multidisciplinary clinical and research program emphasizes the recognition and assessment of people at increased risk for developing cancer because of family cancer history or personal risk factors. A graduate of University of Minnesota with a Bachelor’s of Science in microbiology, he received his medical degree from the University of Minnesota Medical School and conducted his residency in internal medicine at the University of Minnesota Hospitals and Clinics.

Dr. Weitzel’s is a member of such organizations as the Society of Clinical Oncology, Southwest Oncology Group, Cancer Control and Breast Cancer Committees and the Task Force on Cancer Genetics Education for the American Society of Clinical Oncology.